“Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen

This is not an easy task to write about your favourite books. Especially when a book has been your loyal friend for longer than the majority of your real friends. You get protective of that book, just like you would if you had to protect a person.

Like the majority of legendary books, “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen is liked and hated in equal measure. Some find it boring because of the lack of action or female characters, who don’t comply with modern women’s standards. Others adore it and reread it religiously even knowing every line almost by heart.

As you’ve already guessed, I’m from the second team.

I read “Pride and Prejudice” for the first time more than twenty years ago. Since then, I reread it almost every year. And the emotions the book evokes never change. I laugh every time I “see” Mr Bennet. One of the most remarkable book characters of all time! And I can’t stop giggling when I “see” Mr Collins. Another excellent example of a perfect side character. And, of course, my heart fills with butterflies every time Lady Catherine comes to scold Elizabeth, although I know that the result she achieves will be completely opposite to what she hoped for.

To put it into a modern book language, the world-building in that book is absolutely amazing. Jane Austen had not only created a story – she had left us the history. How vividly we see the small world of a noble English lady! How perplexed we feel trying to step into her shoes – walks, balls, family meals, long visits to relatives and friends. How could they live like that? And not only live but also write stories about their life – the life of the whole era – that are far better than any history book.

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